One day road trip in Luxembourg, Clervaux and Esch-sur-Sûre.

One of the last weekends we spent in Luxembourg we decided to do a mini road trip and visit two places we heard about. These places are situated one hour from Luxembourg city, not really that far away. And with a 1-year old toddler, it was just the perfect Saturday get-away.

Durante uno de nuestros últimos fines de semana en Luxemburgo decidimos hacer un mini road-trip de un dia y visitar dos lugares de los cuales habíamos escuchado mucho hablar. Ambos lugares están apenas un poco más de una hora de la capital luxemburguesa; y con un niño de apenas un año es perfecto para una escapadita de un sábado.

 

CLERVAUX

Our first stop was in Clervaux, famous for its castle and the abbey that is a bit  outside of the city but definitely worth the detour.

A walk along the town, taking the time to take few nice pictures here and there. A coffee (actually chocolate for me) break in one of the coffee shops; no need to hurry just to enjoy the place. To get to the abbey nothing easier than driving less than 10 minutes to arrive, with the perk that you drive through the woods. The abbey is still inhabited but you can visit the church, and they have cute gift shop where you can buy apple juice produced locally, and plenty of religious items.

Nuestra primera parada fue en Clervaux, famoso por su castillo y la abadía que queda un poco retirada del pueblo pero que vale la pena ir a ver.

Un paseo por el pueblo, tomándose el tiempo de ir tomando fotos. Luego un coffee break, o más bien una pausa chocolate en uno de los cafés, no hay necesidad de apurarse, lo que importa es disfrutar el lugar. Para llegar a la abadía nada más fácil que manejar menos de diez minutos con el extra de que se pasa a través del bosque. La abadía está aún habitada pero se puede visitar la iglesia y la tienda de regalos para comprar jugo de manzana producido localmente.

 

ESCH SUR SURE

To get to Esch sur Sure you get to drive through such a beautiful landscape that we made a few stops along the way as it was just impossible to resist.

The town is very small, easy to walk around and to see the ancient little houses, the old church and to spot the ruins of the castle. We also visited a antique shop full of old plates, furniture, rusty paints and weird old fashion toys and a lot of dust… But what can I say, I love those shops!

Once we finished exploring the town we walked to the hill to visit one of the remaining towers of the castle, from there you have an amazing view of Ech sur Sure.

Para llegar a Esch sur Sure hay que manejar a través de paisajes super lindos e hicimos varias paradas durante el viaje, era imposible resistirse.

El pueblo es pequeño, fácil de visitar, ver las casitas antiguas, la iglesia y ver las ruinas del castillo. También visitamos una tienda de antigüedades llena de viejos platos, muebles, cuadros oxidados, juguetes antiguos raros y mucho polvo, pero que les puedo decir, me encantan esas tiendas.

Una vez terminamos de explorar el pueblo, caminamos hacia la colina para visitar lo que queda de la torre del castillo desde donde se tiene una vista increíble de Esch sur Sure.

 

LOCH KAPELLE with the old cemetery and the lime avenue

We were just driving back home not even two minutes when I spotted this tree avenue with what looked like a house from the distance. I decided to stop the car and start taking pictures as I was getting close and then I realised it was an old chapel and cemetery.

The Loch Kapell  has its own legend it here it is what is marked on the board on the wall of the chapel:

<According to the legend, the building of the chapel occurred on the following way: and old single lady called Anna -Maria, went shortly before she died to see the lord of the castle of Esch sur Sure and made an agreement with him that after she died , all her possessions (her small house,some money and 2 goats),would be sold, and the money used to build a chapel on the “Loch” where the image of St Anne would be venerated. The chapel to be built was to be called St Anne’s and the picture of the patron saint was to be painted above the porch. After the lady died, the goats that which had since multiplied to become a herd of 300 animals were auctioned. The lord of the castle and wealthy citizen of Ech made donation so that the chapel could be built. In this chapel a particle of the Holy Cross has been conserved since 1775, a gift from the clergyman born in Soller, father confessor of to the Austrian Empress Maria-Therese and her daughter Marie-Antoinette later to become the Queen of France. For this reason, the chapel changed its name the 8th of May 1780: henceforth it was known as the Chapel of the Holly Cross. But it remained known by the name of “Lochkapelle”. The ghotic Calvary scene (Christ on the cross with two thieves, made of lime wood) in the Lochkapelle is one of the finest objects in our cultural heritage. Stylistically, the group is related to German sculpture of the late 15th century.

Lindenallee: Located outside of the village towards Eschdorf near the Lochkapelle. In autumn 1782, Nicholas Mertens planted 4 lime trees near the chapel where there were already two fine lime trees. Since 8.8.1995 the lime avenue together with chapel and the cemetery have been classified as national monument.>

 

Llevaba manejando apenas dos minutos de regreso a casa cuando un camino bordeado de árboles y lo que parecía ser una casa al final del camino llamó mi atención. Pare el carro y me acerqué, y empecé a tomar fotos durante todo el camino hasta llegar frente a lo que resultó ser una capilla.

La Loch Kapell tiene su propia leyenda y aquí les pongo lo que decía en la placa que estaba en el muro de la capilla:

<Según la leyenda, la construcción de la capilla ocurrió de la siguiente manera: una anciana  soltera llamada Anna-Maria, poco antes de morir visitó al Señor del castillo de Esch sur Sure e hizo un acuerdo con él de que cuando ella muriera, todas sus posesiones ( su pequeña casa, algo de dinero y 2 cabras) se venderian y el dinero serviria para construir una capilla en el “Loch” donde la imagen de Santa Ana sería venerada. La capilla sería llamada Santa Ana y una imagen de la patrona debería de ser pintada sobre el porche. Después de la muerte de la anciana, las cabras que se habían multiplicado para convertirse en un rebaño de 300 fueron subastadas. El Señor del castillo y los ricos habitantes de Esch hicieron donaciones para que se construyera la capilla. En esta capilla se conserva un fragmento de la Santa Cruz desde 1775 un regalo del Clérigo nacido en Soller padre confesor de la emperatriz Maria-Theresa y su hija Maria-Antoinette que se convertiría luego en Reina de Francia. Por esta razón la capilla cambió su nombre el 8 de mayo de 1780 de allí en adelante se llamaría la Capilla de la Santa Cruz. Pero siguió siendo conocida como “Lochkapelle”. La escena gótica del Calvario (Cristo en la cruz con dos ladrones, hecha de madera de tilo) en la Lochkapelle es uno de los objetos mas preciados de nuestra patrimonio cultural. Estilísticamente el grupo está relacionado con la escultura alemana del siglo XV.

Lindenallee: Ubicada fuera del pueblo en dirección hacia Eschdorf cerca de Lochkapelle. En otoño de 1782, Nicholas Mertens planto 4 tilos cerca de la capilla en donde ya habían otros dos tilos. Desde el 8.8 .1995 la avenida de árboles junto a la capilla y el cementerio fueron clasificados como monumentos nacionales.>

 

 

 

I hope that my photos captured a bit of the magic of the place, the afternoon light and the beauty of the lime avenue. 

And with this post, I close my chapter of life in Luxembourg, shorter than what we ever imagined, with its ups and downs like everything in life. 

 

Espero que mis fotos hayan capturado un poco de la magia de este lugar, la luz de la tarde y la belleza del camino bordeado de árboles.

Y con este post cierro el capítulo de mi vida en Luxemburgo, un capítulo más corto de lo esperado, con sus altos y bajos como todo en esta vida.

4 thoughts on “One day road trip in Luxembourg, Clervaux and Esch-sur-Sûre.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.